Moves to improve water quality of North End Lake

BY SUPPLIED - SEPTEMBER 1, 2014
An environmental impact assessment has been initiated aimed at improving the “very poor water quality” in the North End Lake and so “fully realise this water body’s socio-economic worth and environmental value.

An environmental impact assessment has been initiated aimed at improving the “very poor water quality” in the North End Lake and so “fully realise this water body’s socio-economic worth and environmental value”.

The Basic Information Document (BID) for the project points out that the cur-rent high bacterial (faecal coliform) levels “make the water unsafe for full and intermediate contact recreational activities”.

It adds, however, that despite the potential health risks, currently the lake is well used for aquatic sports such as powerboat racing and canoeing and also supports a variety of birds and fish as well as otters.

It points out that the main sources of pollution are “organic wastes that enter the lake via stormwater drains from illegal connections of sewer conduits in the catchment, as well as water contaminated by organic wastes entering...from the Korsten Dry Lake sub-catchment” - no significant industrial pollution has been detected.

The BID says the conceptual proposal is to “modify the four problematic stormwater outfalls discharging polluted water into the lake so as to enable effective filtration to take place before the water enters the lake”.

The project involves construction of four attenuation systems comprising gabion walls and the establishment of natural filtration systems “at the entrances of the four permanently discharging storm water outlets at North End Lake”.

The documentation explains that the attenuation system at each stormwater outlet will “incorporate reed beds and other natural filters”.

The aim, it adds, is “to dissipate flows coming through the respective outlets and increase flow retention time to allow contaminants to settle/be absorbed by the filters before the water eventually gets into the lake” - detailed drawings are currently being prepared.

The documentation adds that the attenuation system, when completed, will be “constantly serviced to remove litter/sediment that might be trapped or accumulated, especially during heavy rains”.

Other aspects of the project will include the general cleaning of litter trapped along and near the lake. - Metrominutes

 

IMAGE sourced from www.goal.com