Port Elizabeth port fishing and boat repair industries to be expanded

OCTOBER 20, 2014

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) says that there are plans to extend both the existing local fishing and boat repair facilities in the Port of Port Elizabeth as well as those for recreational boating.

The Port Development Framework Plans 2014 presentation says that the port “has plans to extend these facilities by commercially developing vacant Transnet land adjacent to the port and CBD”.

TNPA says that with the Port of Ngqura now operational, the role of Port Elizabeth “is changing from being the primary central port to one providing niche services complementary to Ngqura.”

In the short-term, it adds, the rationalisation of activities will see both the existing manganese export facility and liquid bulk imports relocated to the Port of Ngqura.

Currently, it states, the port handles more than 11 million tonnes of cargo a year with approximately 950 commercial cargo vessel calls. The 30-year forecast predicts that volumes will increase to over 18 million tonnes a year.

“The port’s future plans include the container terminal’s expansion, berth deepening and stack reconfiguring.

Once the manganese and liquid bulk terminals are decommissioned, the vehicle terminal will be relocated to that region. Further, it states, “there are also plans for the development of land for recreational use”.

TNPA says the 30-year forecast for East London is that it will handle around five million tonnes of cargo a year.

Currently it handles 2.2 million tonnes a year.

TNPA says because the port is situated at the mouth of the Buffalo River, which has steep rocky riverbanks “it is restricted in both width and depth,” and there are therefore “limited opportunities for future port expansion.

“While East London will continue to pro-vide general cargo handling services to its hinterland, the constraints to expansion, the limited hinterland and the development of the new port at Ngqura, suggest that East London will see limited growth in the 30-year planning horizon.” - metrominutes


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