DECEMBER 27, 2014

After losing the toss and being sent in to bat, the home side were under a bit of pressure by the time lunch rolled around but once Dean Elgar got going the momentum swung in favour of the Proteas as they took the win out of the West Indies bowling attack’s sails.

At the close of play the Proteas were 270/2 with Faf du Plessis having to endure an agonising overnight wait on 99 while captain Hashim Amla is on 17.

Elgar and Du Plessis shared a stand of 179 for the second wicket as they got the upper hand in the afternoon and the exploits of the former resulted in a career-best knock of 121 before he was dismissed in the session after tea.

The partnership between the pair is the second highest ever recorded at this ground. The highest ever partnership was a stand of 187 between Arthur Morris and Neil Harvey for Australia against South Africa in 1950.

After sharing in an opening stand of 47 with Alviro Petersen, the left-handed Elgar soldiered hard for his third Test century, reaching the milestone off 208 deliveries in a knock that included 14 boundaries.

Elgar would eventually depart to become debutant left-arm seamer Kenroy Peter’s first Test victim when he found a thin edge after chasing a delivery and was caught behind by West Indies captain Denesh Ramdin.

The knock was Elgar’s highest at this level of cricket and surpassed his previous best of 103 not out against New Zealand at the same venue in 2013.

The West Indies were left to rue several missed opportunities by the end of the day with Elgar surviving a potential stumping and a run-out while Du Plessis was dropped twice, once while in single figures and again on 26.

With regards to the visiting bowling attack only Peters, who ended with 1/44, and Shannon Gabriel, who accounted for Petersen for 17, enjoyed some kind of success on the first day of play.

The match continues into day two today - 27 December.

Photo: Hashim Amla of South Africa runs a single during day 1 of the 2nd Test match between South Africa and West Indies at St. Georges Park on December 26, 2014 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. (Photo by Duif du Toit/Gallo Images)