Walter Sisulu University arts students exceed expectations

NOVEMBER 11, 2016

Walter Sisulu University (WSU) BTech Fine Art students opened their annual exhibition with mind-arresting pieces at the Ann Bryant Gallery recently.

The spiritual and culturally conscious works on display reflected on modern-day social confusion in race and religion.

Some aesthetic and yet arousing pieces on show included Andisiwe Diko’s “Empty Spaces”, which interrogates people’s internal convictions as a result of South Africa’s dark past, education and social stratification.

“In my painting and research thesis I showcase different interior spaces. These are the spaces where my ideas of beauty where formed, such as in salons, TV and conversations with my mother,” said Diko.

Another captivating collection is that of a talented print artist, Luzuko Nethi, titled Ubizo: A combination of rituals and healing practices of traditional healers and those of the Zion Christian Church.

“The study contemplates the interface between Christianity and Ukuthwasa, reflecting on how the Xhosa ethnicity has been reformed to accommodate modern society,” Nethi said.

Phila Phaliso’s thought provoking ceramics work titled Crippled Minds explored the relationships between genders using a bullfighting analogy.  “These relationships are defined by power,” she said.

“Given the billions of people around the world with different races and languages, it is inevitable that complex power relationships will spill over to other sexual orientations,” Phaliso added.  

The students’ work was assessed by two external moderators to ensure the standard of art is of industry quality.

“I love precision and emotions that have been put into the works. A lot of work was put into these pieces as best as they could. And that is all that one need to do; to do the best you can, as you can,” said student supervisor, Dr John Steel

The exhibition will be open until Wednesday, 16 November.