Zuma cleared of paying back the money


Parliament’s ad-hoc committee on Nkandla last night officially adopted Police Minister, Nathi Nhleko’s report, clearing President Jacob Zuma of having to pay back a portion of the R246-million spent on security upgrades at his private home.

Speaking in a statement, Parliamentary spokesperson Temba Gubula said committee members determined that the findings of Public Protector Thuli Madonsela’s Secure in Report, had over exaggerated the “scope, scale and cost of the project”, and that the country had been misled about the opulence Zuma was seemingly living in.

Concluding his visit to Nkandla last month as part of a committee oversight, ad-hoc chairperson Cedrick Frolick described the quality of workmanship as “shocking” and that it raises serious questions about what the money was actually used for.

In an entry on Politicsweb, spokesperson in the office of ANC Chief Whip Stone Sizani, Moloto Mothapo, said Nhelko’s report provides a “thorough and accurate picture of the state of affairs regarding the upgrades” and that it was never intended to replace “any other investigative reports” as pointed out by opposition parties.

“It is unfortunate that the opposition sprung the so-called minority report, which is similar to the DA document it submitted to the committee when it started,” Mothaop said.

“The opposition has repeatedly claimed that the ad-hoc process was illegal and unconstitutional. This is despite the establishment of the committee process itself being the consequence of the demand by the opposition to Parliament following the release of the police minister's report”.

It has since been reported that both the African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP) and Freedom Front Plus (FF Plus) had given notice they plan on taking legal action against the dismissal of Madonsela’s report.