Ricochet News

Inspired by start-up businesses

Mar 9, 2018
Inspired by start-up businesses

The class of 2017 Socio-Economic Development beneficiaries graduated on Thursday, from The Hope Factory’s Personal Development in Business and Introduction to Computers Programme. Powered by The South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA), The Hope Factory is passionate about economic transformation through the personal development of start-up entrepreneurs.

Socio-Economic Development Programme Manager, Bernadette Koert says, “At the start of the Programme 80% of our class had minimal knowledge on how to operate a business. Now on completion they all have a solid foundation on how to run a start-up business successfully and will be able to implement all processes needed to become financially sustainable to start and to grow their businesses. I was honoured to be part of developing these start-ups.”

The Hope Factory’s Personal Development in Business Programme is a 12 month training and mentoring programme to develop an individual’s ability to effectively start and operate their own business. Its three main focus areas include leadership development, business skills development as well as gaining knowledge on how to manage personal and business finances.

A total of 45 individuals graduated from the Programme and in addition 15 of them successfully completed the Introduction to Computers Programme (ICT). These ICT classes are to the benefit and enhancement of the individuals on the Personal Development in Business Programme in order to help them be more efficient in their business operations through the use of technology.

Senior Business Development Manager, Jolandi Snyders says, “Graduation day is a celebration of the achievements our graduates have attained and we are always so privileged to be able to walk the journey with them.”

Maxline Daters, an aspiring fashion designer who is doing big things with her business partner Lukhanyo Sweli in the Fashion Industry, speaks about how the Programme gave her the confidence she needed to become a business woman. Says Maxline, “The Hope Factory taught me how to sell my business. During the year I realized that in order to take our business to the next level we need to apply ourselves and the skills learnt”. Maxline and Lukhanyo are starting their own youth programme at the Missionvale Youth Centre to give back to the community. They are also working hard at opening their own manufacturing warehouse in Missionvale by 2020.

In addition to the Programme’s theoretical curriculum, it also allows opportunity for the entrepreneurs to get to know each other and glean further ideas from one another. Xhanti Lamani, one of the graduates who is in the Tourism Industry says he is most grateful for the opportunities to listen to different ideas and the advice given throughout the year. He says, “Getting new and alternative perspectives on how things are done in business is priceless, The Hope Factory served as a catalyst to both my ideas and my growth”.

Sponsored through Socio-Economic Development contributions from the private sector, the Programme creates opportunities for corporate South Africa to play a role in not only developing individuals with business skills but also impacting their lives, their families and communities. This Programme thus helps empower individuals to become economically active by generating their own income.

In the words of the late Nelson Mandela, “Poverty and deprivation in our midst demean us all. Let us mobilize in one great cooperative national effort the enormous energy of our society in order to overcome and eliminate poverty.” This is exactly what The Hope Factory aims to achieve.