Letter to aunt Yvette Montalbano

Henry

By Marisha Hermann

Dear aunty Yvette, with the last name that every Afrikaner would kill if they tried to pronounce it.

I greet you as Tannie, because I still believe in my Afrikaner norms and values. I believe in the Afrikaner tradition and ways. Not because my parents raised me that way, but because I understand the value of being part of a nation and a cultural community.

In Tannie’s video that op Report ‘s pages were published, Tannie wears a red cap. Tannie talks with Tannie’s finger and tells me how I should vote and also who I should vote for. The red party that Tannie supports and of which Tannie is also a member is smart. Very clever. They use a technique called: Manipulation and they managed to brainwash Tannie.

My great grandmother got up after the war and went on the farm. She thought of me, even though she didn’t know my existence was going to be. I got crochet scraps from her and I plan to make my wedding dress out of them. She has an impact on my life, even if she only thought about me.

My grandfather had both successful businesses, one in the dairy industry and one in the poultry industry. My grandmother sold linen in the streets for income. She later opened a kindergarten. My other grandmother supported her husband, taught at Kleuterkasteel and maintained Heilbron’s gardens. My mother lives out her vocation as a social worker and my father as a labor relations expert.

Aunt Yvette, in this line of work there is something special that Auntie must notice. Covenant and calling. Each of my predecessors lives out their vocation and forms part of the covenant. My great-grandchildren, who I may never meet, are also part of this covenant.

Because I think of my children’s children, I attend the launch of Gimnasium Pretoria, the new Christian Afrikaans school. The chance that they will go to school there is high. I studied at Akademia and served on various committees. The chance that my children’s children will study there is high. I am already building traditions in the university that will determine my children’s children’s future.

Because I think about my children’s children’s future, I work with many youth leaders. Maree van den Berg helps students climb over the gates during a Tuks strike so that the students can get to class. Shaun Christie stands up for his faith at Potchefstroom. Frans de Klerk and his team founded the FAK youth and strive to preserve and protect heritage. Megan Meyer works among students and creates a future for them in work. René van der Vyver fights against injustice. Beatha Groenewald stands up for her and others’ rights.

Just to highlight a few, because there are many more. What Tannie hears here are young Afrikaner leaders who say: We will not be massacred. Even if the red party shouts “kill the farmer“. Just for clarity: The red party is now the very one of which Tannie is a member.

Tannie talks in Tannie’s video that we should vote with our head and not with our heart. My head tells me Tannie does not belong to the red party and my heart agrees. Auntie says we should not only think of our children, but of our children’s children. That’s pretty. That’s what my great grandmother did too.

Since I am also thinking of my children’s children in this election, I am not going to vote for the EFF for this exact reason.

I wish Tannie all the best in this uncertain time where Tannie has a battle within Tannie-self. A battle between Tannie’s white skin, mother tongue and the party that “kill the farmer” shouts, the one supporting Auntie.

  • Marisha Hermann studied BA communication and journalism at Akademia. She is passionate about Afrikanership and so are the youth. Currently, she tours the country and is an intern at various organizations.

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